Competitions

AULSS hosts a number of competitions for law students each year. Competitions are a fantastic chance to interact and experience the law beyond the confines of a lecture theatre. The majority of our competitions are also held throughout other New Zealand law schools, and winners will have the opportunity to compete at a national level. If successful here, competitors may go on to compete on the international stage. The finals of each competition are open to all law students to come and watch, so even if you’re not competing yourself they can still provide a valuable insight into practical law.

Witness Examination

March                                                                   Open to third years and above

The \Witness Examination Competition is first competition of the year and requires competitors to assume the role of lawyer in a fictional court case. Each competitor is given briefs detailing the facts of the case, as well as the facts of a witness. One student is counsel for the plaintiff or prosecution, while another competitor will act as defence counsel. The two competitors compete in a simulated courtroom setting where they each perform direct examination and cross examination of the witnesses before a judge. Competitors are assessed on their ability to present a persuasive argument and their ability to obtain facts. This year, the final will be held in the Minter Ellison Rudd Watts offices, and success here leads to national and international events.

Client Interviewing

Second half sem 1                                               Open to 3rd years and above
Early September                                                  Open to 1st and 2nd years

The Client Interviewing Competition is the largest competition of the year. Two competitors are given the chance to interview a client for 25 minutes. The client, played by an actor, will be provided with a fact scenario and a personality, both of which competitors will attempt to extract. A little charisma and empathy can sometimes go a long way here! The 25 minute interview is followed by a 10 minute self-evaluation. Competitors are assessed on their ability to obtain information as well as their approach to the underlying legal problem. Success in this competition also feeds into national, and international events.

Negotiation

23-25 March                                    Open to 3rd years and above
27-29 July                                         Open to 1st and 2nd year

In this competition, students compete in teams of two. Each team receives a common set of facts and a confidential set of facts known only to that team prior the negotiation. The two pairs of students must then negotiate a transaction or resolve a dispute on behalf of their respective clients within 50 minutes. This is followed by ten-minute self-evaluation. The practical experience gained in this competition is invaluable for those interested in dispute resolution. The teams are assessed on their ability to think laterally, to problem solve under time constraints and to communicate effectively. The winners of senior negotiation go on to represent Auckland at a national level, and internationally if successful.

KPMG Case Competition

​ Teams assume the role of business consultants and are asked to analyse and advise on the relevant details of a case, in conjunction with specific presentation questions.

In 2016 they met with members of an international airline’s board of directors (the KPMG judges).

This is a chance for law students to try on a different hat and test their business thinking. Incredible experience especially for those looking at pursuing business oriented degrees like consulting.

Mooting

A moot is a mock-up of an appellate court argument. Mooting competitions include the Stout Shield, the Junior Moot, the Greg Everard Memorial Moot, and new for 2014, the John Haigh Memorial Moot. These are run throughout the year in conjunction with the University of Auckland Mooting Society and allow students to test and expand on their abilities as a legal advocate beyond the compulsory moots.